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Shake The Lake Graphic Novel takes place in two very different worlds. Our crew starts their adventure in Shasta, a fictional mid-west lake town. Shasta is a small, suburban haven for middle class American families. There's not much for culture here but it's a great place to grow up. Everyone's friendly and accomodating and family values run deep. Deals are sealed with a handshake and Callun and his friends pretty much rule the roost. If this were Texas, these boys had better be playing football but in Shasta, wakeboarding is about the coolest thing a kid can do. The chicks dig it, especially if it's "Kilt Wakeboarding, No Undies." There's lots of trees, green grass, and clean water. The color scheme is blue, green and yellow.

     There's not a lot of ways to make money here as we find out when Cal's parents pressure him to get a summer job. His best options are making $12/hr as a receptionist at the health club, working at the Syntec Gas Station or spraying weeds for the county with his dad. "You're not gonna do better than that in this town until you get your bachelors."

     After Cal gets dumped by his girlfriend and evicted from his rental, he convinces his friends to join him on a summer adventure to Lake Victoria, Arizona. Think Lake Havasu or as named Lake Victoria from "Piranha 3D". This is the Red Neck Riviera. A desert oasis. Just east of the Inland Empire and Southern California "Bro Culture". Big trucks, tattoos, piercings, edgy fashion and razor sharp attitude. It's like Gym-Tan-Laundry, except nobody here needs to tan because it's 105 degrees all summer long and the sun shines every day. And laundry? Nobody wears a full set of clothes. It's bikinis or bust. So its Gym-Party-Get My Nails Did. The chicks are smokin' and unless you're driving a suped up F150 with a dirtbike in the back, pulling a cigarette boat, you're not getting any digits. "We're not in Kansas anymore Dorothy!" Our Shasta crew become fish out of water.

 

  Lucky for them, they've got a childhood friend to help get them settled in the new surroundings. Nika and her best friend Megan take the guys under their wing and do their best to keep them out of trouble. But trouble finds them in the form of two disgruntled Park Rangers named Zeke and Dalton.

  Cal and his friends must adapt and overcome if they're gonna pull off throwing a wake event in this town.

 

Thanks for reading. Check back soon for more information on how we're making the graphic novels. Shake The Lake is the story of a group of friends, chasing the endless summer who find themselves in a new laketown attempting to save a bullied marina from snobby yacht club encroachment by staging a mammoth end-of-summer wakeboarding festival. To get more information, subscribe to our mailing list for tips at creating your own comic book, to keep up to date on our blog and to get release info on the Shake The Lake Graphic Novel Volume 4. You can order volumes 1 & 2 & 3 now on the website. It'll be a hot minute before we're done with V4 so support the project and kick us an email.

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Kids have dreams. I'm talking about the "I'm going to do "x-x" when I get older.." type of dreams. You can likely remember some pretty out-there ambitions you had set for yourself from the comfortable age of 'I-don't-have-to-work-for-my-food-or-housing'. Now, I'm pretty sure 90% of my fellow millennials not only dreamt of being millionaires but were confident that they'd be one by age 30.

 

Maybe your father told you like mine told me, that you could be anything in the world. Pondering that, maybe you asked, "Dad, were you ever a movie star?" Surely, if one could be whatever they wanted to be, a movie star would be near the top of the list. "No," he probably replied like mine did. "Because I found other things that I wanted to do." Maybe there was more pondering. "Dad, were you ever a musician?" Some people don't want to be movie stars but damned if they don't want to be rock stars. "No son. I found other things I wanted to do." Hmmmm. "Well Dad, were you ever an author? Like a published one?" "No son." Even though you were skeptical like me, you didn't doubt Dad's lesson, you just couldn't believe he'd found things he wanted to do that were better than being a movie/rock star and author. You, like me, wanted to be all 3.

 

So, I suppose your Dad wasn't that surprised when you picked up a guitar in college and started recording music. Or when you sent him your first manuscript for a book you had written, or when you left your first professional job to move to Los Angeles to work in movies.

 

And I doubt he was too surprised when you asked for that small $5,000 loan to finish post on a film a few years later. Likewise, he probably wasn't too caught off guard when you had to jump back into the 9-5 to survive and pay back the loan. He wasn't... but you and I were.

 

I guess we forgot one important part of the formula when we were young dreamers. Although, we got to grow up and BE a musician, a filmmaker, an author, We didn't get to BE successful at it. At least not in the universally accepted standard of the word or even a fractional facsimile thereof. We didn't make a living as creators. We paid to be... and heavily.

 

Likely, it's still frustrating to you after 5+ years back in that 9-5 lifestyle. Did we miss some hidden doorway to success? I mean, we've passed 30 and there ain't a million dollars in our bank account. The satisfaction of accomplishment is nearly drowned by the seemingly unnoticed-ness of it all. The effort, the dedication, the will and the financial cost. We know where it went but what was it all for? 

 

... And yet the hunger is still there. The hope. The creative spirit.

 

So, after letting the exhausted creator sleep for a few years while we slowly put the pennies in the bank, put a ring on the love's finger and loosened the belt a few holes, WAKE IT UP. Start the whole damn process again, but this time the progress will be exponentially slower and more calculated. Work your job... give it your full attention, put aside a portion of the paycheck for "creative means". Go home, give home your full attention and THEN... when the rest of the world goes to sleep, work for yourself.

 

There's an ever growing budget and no time limit. I mean, we're already past 30! What's the rush? Maybe enjoy it this time around. Plus, the longer you spend in development, the more money you can set aside for the work.

 

Carefully choose partners to share the journey with and add ingredients to the recipe. If you want to BE a creator then you have to CREATE. No matter life's circumstances, allotted free time, available monies or connections. You just have to find a way. YOUR WAY. Mine looks like 70 hours a week, being a leader, a producer, a boss, a financier and a cheerleader.

 

GOOD LUCK!

 

*Zach's dad did tell him he could be anything in the world and he aims to be.*

zblock1
zblock1

Kids have dreams. I'm talking about the "I'm going to do "x-x" when I get older.." type of dreams. You can likely remember some pretty out-there ambitions you had set for yourself from the comfortable age of 'I-don't-have-to-work-for-my-food-or-housing'. Now, I'm pretty sure 90% of my fellow millennials not only dreamt of being millionaires but were confident that they'd be one by age 30.

Maybe your father told you like mine told me, that you could be anything in the world. Pondering that, maybe you asked, "Dad, were you ever a movie star?" Surely, if one could be whatever they wanted to be, a movie star would be near the top of the list. "No," he probably replied like mine did. "Because I found other things that I wanted to do." Maybe there was more pondering. "Dad, were you ever a musician?" Some people don't want to be movie stars but damned if they don't want to be rock stars. "No son. I found other things I wanted to do." Hmmmm. "Well Dad, were you ever an author? Like a published one?" "No son." Even though you were skeptical like me, you didn't doubt Dad's lesson, you just couldn't believe he'd found things he wanted to do that were better than being a movie/rock star and author. You, like me, wanted to be all 3.

So, I suppose your Dad wasn't that suprised when you picked up a guitar in college and started recording music. Or when you sent him your first manuscript for a book you had written, or when you left your first professional job to move to Los Angeles to work in movies.

And I doubt he was too surprised when you asked for that small $5,000 loan to finish post on a film a few years later. Likewise, he probably wasn't too caught off guard when you had to jump back into the 9-5 to survive and pay back the loan. He wasn't... but you and I were.

I guess we forgot one important part of the formula when we were young dreamers. Although, we got to grow up and BE a musician, a filmmaker, an author, We didn't get to BE successful at it. At least not in the universally accepted standard of the word or even a fractional facsimile thereof. We didn't make a living as creators. We paid to be... and heavily.

Likely, it's still frustrating to you after 5+ years back in that 9-5 lifestyle. Did we miss some hidden doorway to success? I mean, we've passed 30 and there ain't a million dollars in our bank account. The satisfaction of accomplishment is nearly drowned by the seemingly unnoticed-ness of it all. The effort, the dedication, the will and the financial cost. We know where it went but what was it all for? 

... And yet the hunger is still there. The hope. The creative spirit.

So, after letting the exhausted creator sleep for a few years while we slowly put the pennies in the bank, put a ring on the love's finger and loosened the belt a few holes, WAKE IT UP. Start the whole damn process again, but this time the progress will be exponentially slower and more calculated. Work your job... give it your full attention, put aside a portion of the paycheck for "creative means". Go home, give home your full attention and THEN... when the rest of the world goes to sleep, work for yourself.

There's an ever growing budget and no time limit. I mean, we're already past 30! What's the rush? Maybe enjoy it this time around. Plus, the longer you spend in development, the more money you can set aside for the work.

Carefully choose partners to share the journey with and add ingredients to the recipe. If you want to BE a creator then you have to CREATE. No matter life's circumstances, allotted free time, available monies or connections. You just have to find a way. YOUR WAY. Mine looks like 70 hours a week, being a leader, a producer, a boss, a financier and a cheerleader.

GOOD LUCK!
Z